Reduction Block Printing Step by Step

Cabin
Cabin in the Woods, Edition 8, Color Reduction Block Print

Making a reduction block print is a way to print in color without using multiple blocks.  The drawback of using this method is that since you are destroying the block in the process of making the print, your edition is not only truly limited but you may not get as many finished prints as you planned if the color does not register correctly each time you go to print.  Below are the step by step instruction for how I mad the print above.

For this piece, I decided there would be no white color at all. That is important because, like in transparent watercolor, white in block printing is not an applied color but is simply the color of the paper left untouched by ink (or in the case of watercolor, by paint)The best example of this is to see my post on printing a basic block print.    The first color on this print is a  very light gray, therefore, the entire block was inked up with the gray that I mixed. There is no drawing on the block at this point because I am only interested in printing a solid color. The photo below shows the piece of linoleum and the resulting layer of gray ink on paper.

solid color block first color

The next color I want to print is a pale yellow.  But I do not want to cover up the gray I just printed. At this point, I need to get my drawing onto the block so I know where to carve.  You can draw directly on the block or transfer a drawing.  The trunk of the trees, the cabin, the smoke and some branches will remain gray so those parts of the linoleum need to be carved away.  I have inked the block up with the yellow ink I mixed so you can see the cuts better (left) and the resulting print is on the right.   Because these first colors are so pale, they do not translate well in a photo at this stage.

 

 

The next color I want to print is green.  First I need to make sure that my drawing has not been obliterated when cleaning the ink off the block and, if so,  I need to address that first and redraw those lines.  The next thing to do is to cut away the part I want to remain yellow so they will not be covered up by the green ink. Below  you can see the inked block (right) and the resulting print (left). Now that darker colors are being added, the contrast makes it easier to see how the print is developing.

second cuts inked and printed third color

 

The last color I am adding to this print is a dark gray. So I will carve away* everything that I want to remain green so the dark gray does not cover it up.  I ink up the remaining parts of the block with the dark gray ink and pull the print.  The inked block is pictured to the right below and the resulting print is on the left.

last cuts inked and printed fourth color

 

I do want to make a note of something unusual here. Above I put an asterisk (*) after I wrote that I carved away everything I wanted to remain green.  If you look at the block above very closely,  the foreground is still there.  I choose to leave this so my block would not be “floppy”.  Because where the dark gray was being applied was so far away from this foreground area, it was not difficult to ink that part of the block and avoid this uncarved foreground area.  Generally, I would not leave anything uncarved but in this case, having some linoleum remaining at the bottom of the block  gave some stability to the block when I printed it.