The Grocery List Project: Week 8

To learn about this project, click here. This post is organized this way – the grocery lists, information & facts on food insecurity, resources, and anonymous general information about the people who submitted the lists published. Looking for ways to help out? Check with you local school district or houses of worship to see if they sponsor backpack or grocery bag programs. Check online for organizations such as food pantries, food banks, and soup kitchens that collect food in your area. A list of such organization is being compiled below and will be added to each week.

Helpful Hints when Donating to a Food Program:

*Community Food drives are a great way to help. Youth organizations, companies, and houses of worship often sponsor them as a service event and also individuals and HOAs collect from neighbors to deliver to local food pantries and soup kitchens.
*Don’t forget the furry friends! Many food panty and food banks also accept pet food.
*If you garden at home or with a group, consider sharing some of your crops with the local food pantry or soup kitchen.
*Remember that hamburger helper does not help if there is no meat. When donating peanut butter, also consider crackers or bread to go with it.
*Consider donating some pantry staples such as cooking oil, which is needed for a great deal of food preparation, as well as items like sugar, flour, spices, coffee & tea.
*In addition to food, items such as personal grooming products are also needed as well as things like dishwashing detergent. Make sure to donate full size items unless there is a particular reason the organization is looking for “hotel” or “sample” size items. It you are not sure, it is always ok to ask exactly what is needed.
*Food Banks are able to buy in bulk for very good prices so donations of money are always very useful, maybe even more useful than actual food. However, Food Pantries benefit from both actual food items and money. The difference between Food Banks and Food Pantries are as follows: Food Banks feed lots of people from a wide area, either directly or by supplying to soup kitchens and other community food programs. Food Pantries are locally based and address individuals’ needs in the immediate surrounding community. They are often located in churches, or social service agencies as part of larger missions. It is a good idea to check with your local Food Bank/Pantry to see what is most useful to them.
*When donating to backpack programs, choose canned items with pop off or peel off lids in case the recipient does not have or cannot use a can opener.
*When donating macaroni & cheese try to get the kind that is premixed so that no additional ingredients like milk, which may not be available, are needed.

Food Relief Programs:

Feeding America (National program)
National Council on Aging Food Assistance Programs (National program)
Friends of Forgotten Children (New Hampshire)
Brookings County Food Pantry & other resources ( Eastern South Dakota)
Virginia Peninsula Food Bank (S.E. Virginia)
Cherry Hill Food Pantry (Camden County, New Jersey)
Jenkintown Food Cupboard (Montgomery County, Pennsylvania)
Beach Haven Food Pantries (Mid New Jersey Shore Area)
Harry Chapin Food Bank (Southwest Florida)
New Life Food Cupboard (Montgomery County, Pennsylvania)
Media Food Bank (Delaware County, Pennsylvania)
Cape May Community Food Closet (Cape May, New Jersey)
Northern Illinois Food Bank (Northern Illinois)
Hearts and Hands Food Pantry (Huntersville/Charlotte, North Carolina)
Feeding NC (Serving parts of Mecklenburg, Rowan, and Iredell Counties, NC)
Food Pantries in the Coastville, PA area (Chester County, PA)
Cluster Outreach Center (Greater Pottstown, PA area)
Bucks County Housing Group Community Food Pantries (Langhorne/Doylestown, Bucks County, PA)
Maryland Food Bank (Maryland – statewide information)
Food Pantries for Southern Delaware
**Dialing 2-1-1 will connect a person with information on local services that provide assistance.

Info from this week’s shoppers:

One of the households this week consists of two adults and the other consists of two adults and a young child. Both contributors have radically changed the way they shopped during the pandemic, only going to the store once a week. One shopper has used curbside shopping often as well as delivery of certain items from places like Target. One of the participants has access to a military PX and stocks up on certain items when they go there, which is perhaps once a month. Both participants really enjoy cooking. Both participants have mentioned community food drives either sponsored by a neighborhood or service organization.

Go Ahead ~ Bitch and Complain!

Lately I have talked to lots of people who have had days that they just feel, mentally, like crap and they can’t quite figure out why. I include myself in this group of people. The other thing we all have in common is beating ourselves up for feeling this way. It starts off where you are irritable, sad, or weepy and you try to figure out why. Then comes these thoughts: So many people are far worse off than I am, I should be grateful, etc. etc. etc. Well, there are people worse off than you but there are also people who are better off than you, even if the only reason they are better off is that on that particular day you feel like crap and they don’t! And what about being grateful? It is good to be grateful and I truly believe that most people are grateful. But just because you feel like shit, does not mean you are ungrateful.

So go ahead! Spend a day feeling like crap and wallowing in self pity without berating yourself for it. You will probably wake up the next day feeling better. And for that, you can be grateful.

The Grocery List Project: Week 7

To learn about this project, click here. This post is organized this way – the grocery lists, information & facts on food insecurity, resources, and anonymous general information about the people who submitted the lists published. Looking for ways to help out? Check with you local school district or houses of worship to see if they sponsor backpack or grocery bag programs. Check online for organizations such as food pantries, food banks, and soup kitchens that collect food in your area. A list of such organization is being compiled below and will be added to each week.

Some of the crossed out items on this week’s lists include: (TOP LIST): Tofu, bread, english muffins, granola bars, oats, walnuts, eggs, milk, orange juice, tater tots, ice cream, frozen corn, pizza dough, pork, chicken, egg noodles, cheerios, tuna fish, onion salt (BOTTOM LIST): Fish, cream cheese, eggs, milk, prunes, chips, tonic, tissues, kidney and pinto beans, bagels, chicken, beef, spiral ham, bacon, scrapple, chicken pot pie.

Helpful Hints when Donating to a Food Program:

*Don’t forget the furry friends! Many food panty and food banks also accept pet food.
*If you garden at home or with a group, consider sharing some of your crops with the local food pantry or soup kitchen.
*Remember that hamburger helper does not help if there is no meat. When donating peanut butter, also consider crackers or bread to go with it.
*Consider donating some pantry staples such as cooking oil, which is needed for a great deal of food preparation, as well as items like sugar, flour, spices, coffee & tea.
*In addition to food, items such as personal grooming products are also needed as well as things like dishwashing detergent. Make sure to donate full size items unless there is a particular reason the organization is looking for “hotel” or “sample” size items. It you are not sure, it is always ok to ask exactly what is needed.
*Food Banks are able to buy in bulk for very good prices so donations of money are always very useful, maybe even more useful than actual food. However, Food Pantries benefit from both actual food items and money. The difference between Food Banks and Food Pantries are as follows: Food Banks feed lots of people from a wide area, either directly or by supplying to soup kitchens and other community food programs. Food Pantries are locally based and address individuals’ needs in the immediate surrounding community. They are often located in churches, or social service agencies as part of larger missions. It is a good idea to check with your local Food Bank/Pantry to see what is most useful to them.
*When donating to backpack programs, choose canned items with pop off or peel off lids in case the recipient does not have or cannot use a can opener.
*When donating macaroni & cheese try to get the kind that is premixed so that no additional ingredients like milk, which may not be available, are needed.

Food Relief Programs:

Feeding America (National program)
National council on Aging Food Assistance Programs (National program)
Friends of Forgotten Children (New Hampshire)
Brookings County Food Pantry & other resources ( Eastern South Dakota)
Virginia Peninsula Food Bank (S.E. Virginia)
Cherry Hill Food Pantry (Camden County, New Jersey)
Jenkintown Food Cupboard (Montgomery County, Pennsylvania)
Beach Haven Food Pantries (Mid New Jersey Shore Area)
Harry Chapin Food Bank (Southwest Florida)
New Life Food Cupboard (Montgomery County, Pennsylvania)
Media Food Bank (Delaware County, Pennsylvania)
Cape May Community Food Closet (Cape May, New Jersey)
Northern Illinois Food Bank (Northern Illinois)
Hearts and Hands Food Pantry (Huntersville/Charlotte, North Carolina)
Feeding NC (Serving parts of Mecklenburg, Rowan, and Iredell Counties, NC)
Food Pantries in the Coastville, PA area (Chester County, PA)
Cluster Outreach Center (Greater Pottstown, PA area)
Bucks County Housing Group Community Food Pantries (Langhorne/Doylestown, Bucks County, PA)
**Dialing 2-1-1 will connect a person with information on local services that provide assistance.

Info from this week’s shoppers:

The households this week each consist of two adults. The men of both these households tend to be “meat and potato” guys. The woman of one of the households tends to lean towards vegetarianism and the other woman tends to focus more on healthy choices, but is not vegetarian. One of the participants experienced food insecurity growing up. One of the participants lives where meals are provided if desired but prefers to cook their own food. Both participants shop less frequently than they used to.

More Fun with Ephemera

A friend of mine was keeping a journal recording her blood pressure. On a follow up visit to her doctor, she presented him with the journal. As he looked at it he started to chuckle here and there. Then she remembered that along side of some of the pressure readings, she made notations such as “angry” “not enough sleep”, etc. Here is one particular page with a notation from her journal that she said I could share.

The notation above reads “Long Week”

The Grocery List Project: Week 6

To learn about this project, click here. This post is organized this way – the grocery lists, information & facts on food insecurity, resources, and anonymous general information about the people who submitted the lists published. Looking for ways to help out? Check with you local school district or houses of worship to see if they sponsor backpack or grocery bag programs. Check online for organizations such as food pantries, food banks, and soup kitchens that collect food in your area. A list of such organization is being compiled below and will be added to each week.

Some of the crossed out items on this week’s lists include: (TOP LIST) brown rice, honey, ground beef, taco seasoning, sliced turkey, coffee creamer, milk, liquid hand soap refill, vegetables, sausage, pickles, mayo, corn chips, flour, sugar, cornmeal, canola oil, lettuce, tomato, eggs, bread, salsa, black beans, green onion, red onion, tomato paste, limes. (BOTTOM LIST) Milk, sticky buns, soap for office and soap for bathroom.

Helpful Hints when Donating to a Food Program:

*If you garden at home or with a group, consider sharing some of your crops with the local food pantry or soup kitchen.
*Remember that hamburger helper does not help if there is no meat. When donating peanut butter, also consider crackers or bread to go with it.
*Consider donating some pantry staples such as cooking oil, which is needed for a great deal of food preparation, as well as items like sugar, flour, spices, coffee & tea.
*In addition to food, items such as personal grooming products are also needed as well as things like dishwashing detergent. Make sure to donate full size items unless there is a particular reason the organization is looking for “hotel” or “sample” size items. It you are not sure, it is always ok to ask exactly what is needed.
*Food Banks are able to buy in bulk for very good prices so donations of money are always very useful, maybe even more useful than actual food. However, Food Pantries benefit from both actual food items and money. The difference between Food Banks and Food Pantries are as follows: Food Banks feed lots of people from a wide area, either directly or by supplying to soup kitchens and other community food programs. Food Pantries are locally based and address individuals’ needs in the immediate surrounding community. They are often located in churches, or social service agencies as part of larger missions. It is a good idea to check with your local Food Bank/Pantry to see what is most useful to them.
*When donating to backpack programs, choose canned items with pop off or peel off lids in case the recipient does not have or cannot use a can opener.
*When donating macaroni & cheese try to get the kind that is premixed so that no additional ingredients like milk, which may not be available, are needed.

Food Relief Programs:

Feeding America (National program)
National council on Aging Food Assistance Programs (National program)
Friends of Forgotten Children (New Hampshire)
Brookings County Food Pantry & other resources ( Eastern South Dakota)
Virginia Peninsula Food Bank (S.E. Virginia)
Cherry Hill Food Pantry (Camden County, New Jersey)
Jenkintown Food Cupboard (Montgomery County, Pennsylvania)
Beach Haven Food Pantries (Mid New Jersey Shore Area)
Harry Chapin Food Bank (Southwest Florida)
New Life Food Cupboard (Montgomery County, Pennsylvania)
Media Food Bank (Delaware County, Pennsylvania)
Cape May Community Food Closet (Cape May, New Jersey)
Northern Illinois Food Bank (Northern Illinois)
Hearts and Hands Food Pantry (Huntersville/Charlotte, North Carolina)
Feeding NC (Serving parts of Mecklenburg, Rowan, and Iredell Counties, NC)
Food Pantries in the Coastville, PA area (Chester County, PA)
**Dialing 2-1-1 will connect a person with information on local services that provide assistance.

Info from this week’s shoppers:

Each list this week represents a household of two adults. One participant learned to cook from her mother who was a trained home economist. Both households tend to eat at home, especially since the Pandemic. One participant cooks large meals and freezes smaller portions. One participant is from the Philippines where food insecurity is widespread. One participant grew up in the age of “frozen food and Jello”. One participant shops for bargains, particularly of meat and then breaks down the package to smaller servings. Both participants have access to farmer’s markets.

Personal Treasures & Ephemera

Tonight I will be listening to a talk on how to store your personal paper treasures. I have always be intrigued by ephemera – those odd scraps of paper and things people throw away (movie tickets, grocery lists, etc.) In fact, once I had the privilege of holding a job where a good chunk of my responsibility was going through such papers at the Urban Archives at Temple University.

Not long ago, a dear friend of mine came across some wonderful personal ephemera – the bill from the hospital when she was born as well as some other goodies related to the event! She very graciously sent it to me and allowed me to share it. Aside from the prices, I get a kick out of the simplicity of the address on the envelope. At the time, the area was very rural. And the least I can do in gratitude for her allowing me to share this is to also share the link to her website (truly one of the most gifted pastel artists of today) https://www.hvefinn.com/

The Grocery List Project: Week 5

To learn about this project, click here. This post is organized this way – the grocery lists, information & facts on food insecurity, resources, and anonymous general information about the people who submitted the lists published. Looking for ways to help out? Check with you local school district or houses of worship to see if they sponsor backpack or grocery bag programs. Check online for organizations such as food pantries, food banks, and soup kitchens that collect food in your area. A list of such organization is being compiled below and will be added to each week.
Shopper A is above, Shopper B below showing front and back of list

Helpful Hints when Donating to a Food Program:

*Remember that hamburger helper does not help if there is no meat. When donating peanut butter, also consider crackers or bread to go with it.
*Consider donating some pantry staples such as cooking oil, which is needed for a great deal of food preparation, as well as items like sugar, flour, spices, coffee & tea.
*In addition to food, items such as personal grooming products are also needed as well as things like dishwashing detergent. Make sure to donate full size items unless there is a particular reason the organization is looking for “hotel” or “sample” size items. It you are not sure, it is always ok to ask exactly what is needed.
*Food Banks are able to buy in bulk for very good prices so donations of money are always very useful, maybe even more useful than actual food. However, Food Pantries benefit from both actual food items and money. The difference between Food Banks and Food Pantries are as follows: Food Banks feed lots of people from a wide area, either directly or by supplying to soup kitchens and other community food programs. Food Pantries are locally based and address individuals’ needs in the immediate surrounding community. They are often located in churches, or social service agencies as part of larger missions. It is a good idea to check with your local Food Bank/Pantry to see what is most useful to them.
*When donating to backpack programs, choose canned items with pop off or peel off lids in case the recipient does not have or cannot use a can opener.
*When donating macaroni & cheese try to get the kind that is premixed so that no additional ingredients like milk, which may not be available, are needed.

Food Relief Programs:

Feeding America (National program)
National council on Aging Food Assistance Programs (National program)
Friends of Forgotten Children (New Hampshire)
Brookings County Food Pantry & other resources ( Eastern South Dakota)
Virginia Peninsula Food Bank (S.E. Virginia)
Cherry Hill Food Pantry (Camden County, New Jersey)
Jenkintown Food Cupboard (Montgomery County, Pennsylvania)
Beach Haven Food Pantries (Mid New Jersey Shore Area)
Harry Chapin Food Bank (Southwest Florida)
New Life Food Cupboard (Montgomery County, Pennsylvania)
Media Food Bank (Delaware County, Pennsylvania)
Cape May Community Food Closet (Cape May, New Jersey)
Northern Illinois Food Bank (Northern Illinois)
Hearts and Hands Food Pantry (Huntersville/Charlotte, North Carolina)
**Dialing 2-1-1 will connect a person with information on local services that provide assistance.

Info from this week’s shoppers:

About this week’s shoppers: One list represents a family of two semi-retired adults and the other, a family of three with one school age child. One family has one member that is a vegetarian. Both families enjoy experimenting with flavors from other cultures and fresh vegetables. One family sources many of its fresh foods from local markets, CSAs, and businesses that deliver “ugly” produce that might otherwise go to waste. Both families have changed the way they shop during the Pandemic. One participant was regularly participating in local cooking demonstrations at their local library which changed their taste and the way they shopped.

The Grocery List Project: Week 4

To learn about this project, click here. This post is organized this way – the grocery lists, information & facts on food insecurity, resources, and anonymous general information about the people who submitted the lists published. Looking for ways to help out? Check with you local school district or houses of worship to see if they sponsor backpack or grocery bag programs. Check online for organizations such as food pantries, food banks, and soup kitchens that collect food in your area. A list of such organization is being compiled below and will be added to each week.

Helpful Hints when Donating to a Food Program:

*Consider donating some pantry staples such as cooking oil, which is needed for a great deal of food preparation, as well as items like sugar, flour, spices, coffee & tea.
*In addition to food, items such as personal grooming products are also needed as well as things like dishwashing detergent. Make sure to donate full size items unless there is a particular reason the organization is looking for “hotel” or “sample” size items. It you are not sure, it is always ok to ask exactly what is needed.
*Food Banks are able to buy in bulk for very good prices so donations of money are always very useful, maybe even more useful than actual food. However, Food Pantries benefit from both actual food items and money. The difference between Food Banks and Food Pantries are as follows: Food Banks feed lots of people from a wide area, either directly or by supplying to soup kitchens and other community food programs. Food Pantries are locally based and address individuals’ needs in the immediate surrounding community. They are often located in churches, or social service agencies as part of larger missions. It is a good idea to check with your local Food Bank/Pantry to see what is most useful to them.
*When donating to backpack programs, choose canned items with pop off or peel off lids in case the recipient does not have or cannot use a can opener.
*When donating macaroni & cheese try to get the kind that is premixed so that no additional ingredients like milk, which may not be available, are needed.

Food Relief Programs:

Feeding America (National program)
National council on Aging Food Assistance Programs (National program)
Friends of Forgotten Children (New Hampshire)
Brookings County Food Pantry & other resources ( Eastern South Dakota)
Virginia Peninsula Food Bank (S.E. Virginia)
Cherry Hill Food Pantry (Camden County, New Jersey)
Jenkintown Food Cupboard (Montgomery County, Pennsylvania)
Beach Haven Food Pantries (Mid New Jersey Shore Area)
Harry Chapin Food Bank (Southwest Florida)
New Life Food Cupboard (Montgomery County, Pennsylvania)
Media Food Bank (Delaware County, Pennsylvania)
**Dialing 2-1-1 will connect a person with information on local services that provide assistance.

Info from this week’s shoppers:

The people represented in this week’s lists are both households of two adults. The one list template was created many, many years ago and has been photocopied and used ever since. One of the participants loves to bake and also makes wine. One of the lists is more of a “stop by the store” rather than a full week of groceries.